Discover Where Head Lice Comes From and a Permanent Solution for Eliminating Them

Lice

Most people can confess to finding lice in their lives only when their children are highly infested. Some do not even know if they came back home with some from school or they got them from the neighbors. Most people ask, how did lice infest our family?

Many people will think the pets or the school is responsible. But is this really true?

Where do head lice come from?

Let’s first agree that lice do not come from animals or pets. They are transferred from human to human. Now that we have that out of the way, we can move on. Louse is an ectoparasite, which means it lives on the surface of the host. This insect lives on the human scalp and feeds on the human blood. A louse spends its entire life on the human scalp.

Research has proven that head lice spread among the humans for many thousands of years. Evidence of lice has been found among humans since the early days and they have not been able to eradicate them completely.

The sad thing is even if you completely eliminate the ones in your house using the best treatments for lice, there are thousands of houses that have more lice and if you are not careful, they will find their way back to your home again.

Nobody can tell the first appearance of lice in the human life but it has been documented to have lived for many years.

So how are lice contracted?

Lice do not walk or jump or fly; they only crawl. They have their six legs that are adapted to clinging to the hair rather than walking. They have a tight cling that does not let go very easily until you thoroughly comb your hair.

Lice do not like light; that’s why they hide under the hair near the roots to completely avoid light. They simply move from head to head through physical contact – in children, sitting together in a classroom in close seats or in a cinema or people sleeping together. They are less commonly spread through shared items like combs, brushes and towels.

The transmission rate for head lice is about 95% of physical contact. Head lice do not live and are not contacted from sand, swimming pools, wood, furniture, etc. They cannot exist outside of a human scalp.

The reason why children are the most affected is that most parents barely check their children’s hair from time to time.

So what’s the way forward?

If everyone reading this article would do their part in eliminating these disturbing insects, then the infestation rate would go lower and fewer children would carry them around.

If parents would work more on preventing rather than curing, then it would be easy to maintain a lice-free environment both at home and at school.

If parents would ensure hygiene is highly maintained in their children’s bodies, then both head and body lice would easily be eliminated.

Lastly, every person is responsible for a better society. The fight to eliminate these deadly insects can only be won if everyone is involved. This is not one man’s fight!